March 7, 2012
 Israel Thing:
A mockup of the street corner at Houston and Mott in New York where Kehinde Wiley’s Alios Itzhak, a 2011 painting of an Israeli Ethiopian man, will be recreated on a 20’ x 35’ wall by three artists from the Brooklyn firm Overall Murals. The “wallscape” is a promo for “Kehinde Wiley/The World Stage: Israel,” the artist’s exhibition at the Jewish Museum, which features portraits,of youths—Ethiopian Jews, native-born Jews and Arab Israelis— whom the artist scouted discos, malls, bars, and sporting venues. Wiley, who adorned the portraits with motifs adapted from Jewish ceremonial objects, also selected textiles and papercuts from the museum’s permanent collection to showcase alongside his paintings. 
The portraits of Israelis by a non-Jewish artist from South Central L.A., who maintains studios in New York, Beijing and Dakar, encapsulate the current moment: global (rather than multicultural), post-ethnic (rather than “too Jewish”). It’s an ideal project for an ethnically specific museum struggling to attract new audiences without abandoning its mission: it bears the hip-hop cachet sure to attracted the coveted youth demographic, even as it showcases Judaica that’s usually ghettoized, so to speak, in the permanent-collection galleries.
Related programming includes a concert on Thursday featuring Ethiopian-Israeli hip-hop artist Kalkidan Mashasha (whose portrait is in the show) and composer, multimedia artist and writer Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky. Now that’s global warming. 

Kehinde Wiley, Alios Itzhak (The World Stage: Israel), 2011, oil and gold enamel on canvas. The Jewish Museum, New York; Purchase: Gift of Lisa and Steven Tananbaum Family Foundation; Gift in honor of Joan Rosenbaum by the Contemporary Judaica, Fine Arts, Photography, and Traditional Judaica Acquisitions Committee Funds, 2011-31.  © Kehinde Wiley.  Courtesy Roberts & Tilton, Culver City, California.

 Israel Thing:

A mockup of the street corner at Houston and Mott in New York where Kehinde Wiley’s Alios Itzhak, a 2011 painting of an Israeli Ethiopian man, will be recreated on a 20’ x 35’ wall by three artists from the Brooklyn firm Overall Murals. The “wallscape” is a promo for “Kehinde Wiley/The World Stage: Israel,” the artist’s exhibition at the Jewish Museum, which features portraits,of youths—Ethiopian Jews, native-born Jews and Arab Israelis— whom the artist scouted discos, malls, bars, and sporting venues. Wiley, who adorned the portraits with motifs adapted from Jewish ceremonial objects, also selected textiles and papercuts from the museum’s permanent collection to showcase alongside his paintings. 

The portraits of Israelis by a non-Jewish artist from South Central L.A., who maintains studios in New York, Beijing and Dakar, encapsulate the current moment: global (rather than multicultural), post-ethnic (rather than “too Jewish”). It’s an ideal project for an ethnically specific museum struggling to attract new audiences without abandoning its mission: it bears the hip-hop cachet sure to attracted the coveted youth demographic, even as it showcases Judaica that’s usually ghettoized, so to speak, in the permanent-collection galleries.

Related programming includes a concert on Thursday featuring Ethiopian-Israeli hip-hop artist Kalkidan Mashasha (whose portrait is in the show) and composer, multimedia artist and writer Paul Miller, aka DJ Spooky. Now that’s global warming. 

Kehinde Wiley, Alios Itzhak (The World Stage: Israel), 2011, oil and gold enamel on canvas. The Jewish Museum, New York; Purchase: Gift of Lisa and Steven Tananbaum Family Foundation; Gift in honor of Joan Rosenbaum by the Contemporary Judaica, Fine Arts, Photography, and Traditional Judaica Acquisitions Committee Funds, 2011-31.  © Kehinde Wiley.  Courtesy Roberts & Tilton, Culver City, California.

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    This is interesting in that it looks at largely unacknowledged communities in Israel—the Beta Israel (Ethiopian Jews)...
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